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Plants – Water Transportation

 

This week’s science task has two options depending on whether you have the resources to carry out an experiment.  Either option is absolutely fine.

 

Regardless of which option you are going to do, all children can read the PowerPoint and have a go at the ‘Prediction’ task, both of which are included below.

 

Option 1 – Water transportation experiment.

The experiment involves you investigating the relationship between temperature and how quickly water can be transported (moved) around a plant.

 

There are two ways in which you can do this experiment – again it depends on the equipment and resources you have access to.  This experiment requires you to have at least 2 white flowers (such as carnations, chrysanthemums, gerberas) or at least 2 celery sticks and at least two beakers/containers/water bottles that are as identical as possible.  If you are using celery, you need to keep the leaves on and chop a small amount off the bottom so that it is fresh.

 

Option A

This is the simpler version of the experiment. With this option, you will compare how fast water is transported through a flower/celery stick placed at two different temperatures – room temperature and in the fridge (or somewhere else that is cool).

Option A equipment list:

  • 2 identical white flowers OR 2 celery sticks
  • 2 identical beakers/containers/water bottles
  • 100 ml of water per beaker/container/water bottle
  • 5 tablespoons of food colouring (dark colours work best) per beaker/container/water bottle
  • Space in the fridge (or somewhere cooler than room temperature).

 

Option B

This involves another flower/celery stick in a different location to provide a further comparison.  With this option, you will compare how fast water is transported through a flower/celery stick placed at three different temperatures – room temperature, in the fridge and in a warm place such as near a radiator.

Option B equipment list:

  • 3 identical white flowers OR 3 celery sticks
  • 3 identical beakers/containers/water bottles
  • 100 ml of water per beaker/container/water bottle
  • 5 tablespoons of food colouring (dark colours work best) per beaker/container/water bottle
  • Space in the fridge (or somewhere cooler than room temperature).
  • A warm spot somewhere, possibly somewhere near a radiator.

 

How to carry out the experiment is included in the PowerPoint from slide 13 onwards.

When carrying out an experiment, it is really important to observe any changes and record them. 

You can record your results with a simple sentence or diagram to explain what you can see and what has changes.  I have added a recording table below but you do not have to use it.

You will need to decide how often you are going to check on your flowers/celery sticks to record any changes – are you going to check on them every half hour, every hour, every hour and a half etc?

By observing and reporting on your results, it will help you to form a conclusion.  Does temperature have an affect on how quickly water is transported through a plant?  If so, what is the affect?

 

Option 2 – Research task and diagram

 

Read the PowerPoint with an adult up to slide 13.

 

Have a go at the ‘Prediction’ task.

 

Option 2 Task 1:

Can you find out how water is transported (moved) around a plant?

 

These videos of the experiment are really useful to watch.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIug9Foou3s

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/class-clips-video/science-ks1-ks2-ivys-plant-workshop-how-does-water-get-from-the-roots-to-the-leaves/zdtfjhv

 

Option 2 Task 2:

Can you draw a diagram and create a poster to explain how water is transported through plants?  It would be even better if you could label your diagram to explain what is happening.

 

I have included a drawing of a flower from our first plants lesson to help you if needed to form the basis of your poster.

PowerPoint and Prediction task for all

Nursery – Mrs Harper & Mrs Bareham
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